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Ike COLLEGE 
GREETINGS 




OCTOBER-l 91 5 



Secretary Photographer's Association of Illinois. 

Awarded Silver Medal for Home Photographer at Illinois State 
Convention, 1914 

OTTO SPEITH 

PORTRAITURE BY PHOTOGRAPHY 
SOUTHWEST COR. SQUARE 



GIRLS, PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



ROBERT H. REID 

"Photographs That Please" 

Member Photographer's Association of America 
HOCKENHULL BUILDING 



^3l)e (Tollege (Breetin^s 



I3l)e College <&reeUngs 

The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of Illinois Woman's College. 

Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due the 
fifteenth of each month. 

Subscriptions, $1.00 a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies 15c. 

Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 



CONTENTS 

To an Autumn Leaf 2 

Editorial 3 

Quiet Hour for Four Years 5 

On the Second Day 7 

On Art of Developing 8 

Opening Chapel 10 

Lake Geneva 11 

New College Song 13 

A Challenge — Mobolization 14 

Alumnae Notes 15 

Endowment and Improvement Fund 18 

Faculty Notes 18 

Locals 19 

Students' Association 20 

Y. W. C. A. Notes 21 

Phi Nu Society 21 

Theta Sigma — Belles Lettres 22 

Lambda Alpha Mu — Expression 23 

The College of Music 24 

Art Notes 25 

Home Economics Club 26 

Swimming Pool 26 










TO AN AUTUMN LEAF. 



Wee shallop of shimmering gold! 
Slip down from your ways in 
the branches, 
Some fairy will loosen your hold; 
Wee shallop of shimmering gold, 
Spill dew on your bows and unfold 
Silk sails for the fairest of 
launches! 
Wee shallop of shimmering gold, 
Slip down from your ways in 
the branches! 

— Charles Henry Luders. 










Ci)e College Greeting* 



Vol. XIX. Jacksonville, 111., October, 1915 No. 1. 



Faculty Adviser — Miss Jennie Anderson. 

Editor-in-chief — Ruth Want. 

Associate and Alumnae Editor — Alma Harmel. 

Assistant Editor — Margaret Slatten. 

Art Editor— Ruth Patton. 

Business Manager — Ruth Taylor. 

Assistant Business Managers — Phyllis Wilkinson, Ila Allen. 



Editorial 



"The lightning bug is brilliant 

But he hasn't any mind ; 

He goes blundering thru existence 

With his headlight on behind. 

Now the measuring worm is different; 

When he goes out for pelf, 

He stretches to the limit 

And then he humps himself." 

The opening of the school year is the appropriate 
time for fair resolutions, and altho line-a-day books 
have already chronicled very many, no doubt, there is 
a vital sentiment in the homely lines above that the 
busy college girl might well grant the distinction of a 
motto, as she looks ahead into the semester. It is no 

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Ofye College Greetings 



uncommon thing to see a girl rushing from one com- 
mittee to another, preparing for her classes in a super- 
ficial way, wearing about her a noticable air of flurry 
and uneasiness, and, withal, failing to accomplish her 
utmost, because she lacks the directing power that 
would lead her forward to her goal. Such a lightning 
bug attitude bespeaks immaturity. On the other hand, 
one of the surest signs of growth in a college student is 
the assertion through her actions of a definite purpose 
f ul direction. No one is blind to the charm that belongs 
to the person who is mistress of herself and her time, 
and yet the ability to acquire such control is greatly in 
need of cultivation with most of us. 

Let us reverse the headlight and turn its gleam 
ahead of our schedules upon the possibilities that are 
awaiting us. Among other gains we should open up an 
opportunity for wider scholarship. Aside from giving 
conscientious attention to the assigned tasks, we might 
find time for more intensive work, for browsing among 
the volumes of the old masters, and for reading the 
poets. The magazine shelves might receive more at- 
tention as well, and we might have the inspiration, 
through reading other college papers, of comparing the 
articles written and the activities described with what 
we are doing ourselves. Mentally, we would stretch 
ourselves to the highest standard, and with prepared- 
ness as our watchword, would be in a position to follow 
the humble measuring worm and exert ourselves to 
such an extent that this year would mark the greatest 
season of individual growth ever known in the college. 



Page Four 



13 1)£ College <&rectln<js 



OUR QUIET HOUR-FOR FOUR YEARS. 



I. w. c. 

September 21, 1912. 
Dearest Chum of my Giddy High School Days : 

Well, this is my first Sunday at I. W. C, but it 
seems as if I had been here for ages. I know fifteen 
girls on my corridor and seven in Harker Hall ; I know 
how to find the dining room without having to start 
out from my own room ; I know where to find the "Re- 
serve Shelf" for English history books ; I know not to 
ask Seniors if they have been here before, and I know 
a Faculty member even if I see her outside the class 
room. All this knowledge has soaked into my crani- 
um since last Tuesday, but I am perfectly positive that 
I can never learn to like the idea of being cooped up 
in this little room from two-thirty till five every Sun- 
day afternoon. Why, I'll just die! Hence forth im- 
agine me languishing in my cell during this quiet hour, 
as they call it (seems like twelve to me) while lucky 
folk are out enjoying themselves. My roommate and 
I are both so homesick that we shall not dare go down 
to luncheon because her eyes and my nose are perfect 
sights. I have already committed to memory three of 
the psalms that we recite in chapel and studied every 
"tip" in my little brown hand book, but here it is only 
three-thirty! If that dear old five o'clock bell ever 
rings I shall simply shout for joy. 



I. W. C. 

September 21, 1913. 

Quiet Hour. 

Dear Betty : 

Yes, I know I promised to write to you immediate- 
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*DI)e College (BreeUngs 



ly, but I have been busy manipulating new girl's 
suit cases and trying to unpack at the same time that I 
just could not get hold of a single extra minute dodg- 
ing around a corner. It is quite a relief to find a little 
time to recall memories of last year in a long visit with 
one's roommate, as well as to get an epistle or two 
composed. Seriously, the quiet hour is not such a bug 
bear as I used to think it. I just get busy writing 
letters and, strange as it may seem, that darling five 
o'clock bell rings suprisingly early. I heard a senior 
say today that she enjoyed the quiet hour. Well, I 
can scarcely say that for it, but I can at least tolerate 
it now. 

September 20, 1914. 
Betty Dear: 

Just a bit of a note to tell you that the year is 
starting beautifully, both for the school and for me. I 
was a little disappointed in not being able to take quite 
the course I had planned this summer, on account of 
conflicts, but my schedule is perfection itself, not a 
single class after two-fifteen on Saturday. I will write 
a real letter some time this week, but it is now quiet 
hour, that blessed institution of college days, and I am 
going to sleep the whole afternoon. I can not imagine 
what we girls should ever do without this rare time 
for a little extra rest. 

Yours sleepily, 

JANE. 

September 19, 1915. 
Dear Betty : 

Please feel yourself highly honored, because I am 
taking a part of the precious quiet hour for writing 

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X3lje College (Breetlngs 



to you. I am counting heavily on my Sunday after- 
noon reading for this year and already have begun on 
the course we planned together this summer. My 
roommate wants to read about the same things. Just 
think of the delightful time we are going to have, read- 
ing and discussing the same books. I feel as if the 
quiet hour were a little present given by Father Time, 
a present to be very carefully and thoughtfully handl- 
ed. I cannot understand how I ever could have dis- 
liked it when I was a Freshman, for now it is the time 
to which I look forward all week long. 

Now, this is all for today, for I am going to say 
"Howdy-do" to my new book. 

Your happy, 

JANE. 
—Helen McGhee, '16. 



ON THE SECOND DAY. 



Come in! Oh it's you? dear— 

I wish that I'd never have come here ! 

I want to go home to my mother and cat, 

For everyone tells me I'll surely get fat, 

My schedule I just simply can't straighten out; 

I don't like my room-mate; she's a terrible pout. 

I hate to wear hats, and I don't like this town, 

Did you know I'd forgotten to bring my best gown? 

The meals are just fine — things might be worse — 

But the day that I came, I did lose my purse. 

And the girls — O I just think they're dandy. 

I guess I will stay — take some of this candy. 

Page Sewn 



Olje College (Breetlngs 



ON THE ART OF DEVELOPING. 



There are many kinds of developing — there is the 
developing of films, the developing of great scientific 
truths, and even the developing of mumps. Besides 
these there is the developing of mumps. This 

in its most usual sense means the creating of a soul, 
or rather the realization of such a possession, in the 
young girl who is sent to college by doting parents to 
blossom into pure and lovely womanhood, and inci- 
dentally to acquire knowledge. 

The average freshman is just a happy, care-free 
creature engaged in no more praiseworthy occupation 
than that of pursuing the art of having a good time 
as fast as her pumps will carry her. This does not 
mean that she is wholly frivolous, for no one could 
have gone through high school and listened to com- 
mencement addresses without feeling at some time 
that a certain responsibility does rest upon her and 
that in due time she must take her place in the world 
and share the burdens of her fellow men. Perhaps 
she has even gone so far as to display her vast know- 
ledge of life and its meaning by mounting her peak 
of knowledge on commencement night and attempting 
to tell her admiring relatives and friends in fifteen 
minutes whether life is worth living or not. The vague 
and uneasy emotions which possess her at such times 
do not, however, reach deeply, and have only a fleeting 
existence. 

No sooner has she reached that zenith of her 
dreams, college, with its fudge parties and good times, 
than she hears an "old girl" say of a "not so old girl", 
"Isn't she developing wonderfully?" The meaning of 

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Z3lje College (Greetings 



this is rather vague to her, so she dutifully forgets all 
about it until she gets into her class work. 

Before she knows it, she is finding out that what 
the instructors want is not that she should know that 
Chaucer wrote "Canterbury Tales" or that Elizabeth 
reigned from 1558 to 1603, but that through studying 
these things she should cultivate sympathy with her 
fellowmen and a sense of her responsibility in life. 

At the same time she begins to adjust herself to 
the perplexities of college life and stretching her elas- 
tic brain a fraction she takes a kind but impartial sur- 
vey of the new ideas of living with which she has come 
in contact. Mentally assimulating and digesting them, 
she adopts a few. She is beginning to develop. 

She now finds out that the animated discussion 
of some instructors and upper classmen on Shaw's 
Ethics of Higher Organisms isn't as dry as she thought, 
and she even finds herself listening with more than 
half interest to their pleasant, well modulated voices 
as they put as much enthusiasm into such a subject 
as she would implant in a consultation over Alice's 
dance. She is reaching a higher stage of development. 

Meanwhile the awakening of sympathy with the 
trials and tribulations of others and the responsibility 
of her debt to the world dawns larger and larger upon 
the horizon of her outlook upon life. She places her- 
self so vitally into the lives of the dead and fictitious 
people whom she studies that she sheds oceans of tears 
over poor Mary, Queen of the Scots, lies awake nights 
planning revenge on fat Henry VIII for being so cruel 
to his flock of wives, and finally acquires such an 
acute sympathy with the troubles of others that she 
feels that the burdens and sorrows of the ages are upon 
her shoulders. She tries to escape it, but she might 



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I3t)e College Greetings 



as well try to escape the measles. The developing 
process is a painful, a most painful, one. 

She feels that to be of real value to mankind and 
incidentally, remove some of the awful responsibility 
which rests upon her, she must be a missionary. She 
must go to some heathen land and there do deeds which 
will be a credit to her Anglo-Saxon ancestry. Still 
painful agony of mind ! 

Finally as she goes on through her college course 
she realizes that the good that is in her is of small use 
so long as it stays there, so she begins to distribute it 
to those with whom she comes in daily contact. Soon 
she is just a normal, happy girl filled with the joy of a 
beautiful, wholesome, and useful life and whose am- 
bition is to bring this joy to others. She has devel- 
oped as her Alma Mater wishes her to, and in the end 
the process is not painful. 

— Maude Strubinger, '18. 



OPENING CHAPEL. 

Cheerfulness was the pervading spirit of our first 
Chapel service, and it was accordingly propitious that 
we should sing, "I feel the winds of God to-day" as a 
common expression of the feeling of all. There was 
a quick and earnest response from the students as Dr. 
Harker pointed out to us the "Royal Road to Learning." 
He told us that through the gateway of the college, we 
enter upon success, measured from whatever point of 
view, be it position, finance, character, influence, or 
service. College brings to her students three great 
privileges, the influence of the personalities in the f ac- 

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T3lje College Greetings 



ulty, association with our fellow students, the oppor- 
tunities for vigorous health. But in order to gain rich- 
ly, we must give ourselves freely to the spirit of college 
life. 

After the address, we were happy to hear Miss 
LaZelle, in her first appearance before the students, 
and were glad to have introduced several old friends 
of the college who were with us on this initial day. The 
climax of the morning was reached when the announce- 
ment was made of Dr. David Strawn's gift to our en- 
dowment fund. The amount, thirteen thousand dollars, 
was large enough to have created much joy, but the 
fact that it came in the form of the Ayers house on 
West State , which has always been a favorite with 
the college girls, made the gift doubly appreciated. For 
such a joyous reunion service, there could have been 
no more appropriate close than the triumphant strains 
of the Alma Mater. 



LAKE GENEVA. 



Lake Geneva! Lake Geneva! 
Thy praises we will sing 
Till the story of thy beauty 
Thru all the school shall ring. 
Lake Geneva ! Lake Geneva ! 
Place for laughter, song, and cheer, 
Place where everbody's happy, 
Place where good is always near. 

Geneva, the place for lively, enthusiastic classes, 
for athletics and for a rousing good time! The very 
minute we caught a glimpse of the camp from the min- 

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*C?S)e College Greetings 



iature steamer, and felt a thrill of the Geneva spirit of 
happiness, we were in love with the place. It was im- 
possible to be anything but happy and contented in 
such an environment. To sit near the water's edge 
and hear the little waves as they broke against the 
rocks; to look across the lake to the green-covered 
ridges, sometimes almost invisible in the fog ; made us 
feel as if they were in a holy place. The trees were 
beautiful in their coverings of ancient bark, and the 
hills were lovely, even if they were hard to climb. It 
was a difficult matter to select a class from the list of 
alluring subjects; but, when we were settled, each of 
us was glad that she had chosen that particular class— 
the class with the most interesting teacher and the 
most vital questions to discuss. The afternoons were 
spent in swimming, rowing, basket-ball, tennis, and 
hiking. It was well worth the blistered feet when 
Johanna, Helen, Mary and Gertrude were awarded 
their "Y's", and I. W. C. may well be proud that she 
possesses four out of the hundred and seventy-two in 
the United States. 

We were happy to have a whole tent full of girls 
under our new college banner and were especially glad 
that Miss Neville and Miss Robinson of the faculty 
were there as members of our delegation. Although 
perhaps the biggest thing about our convention was 
the friendships we formed in our own group, still the 
reception, for the new girls to get acquainted ; College 
day, for each school to give its favorite yell; the visit 
to Yerkes Observatory ; the diving and swimming con- 
tests ; the sail given the Women's College girls by Mrs. 
Curtis; were events that helped to fill the ten days 
full of good times. Although we were not entirely 
successful in the attempt to restrain our hilarity, we 



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X3l)<t ColUje Greetings 



were very grateful to the night watchman for his 
kindly suggestion that we read the rules of the camp. 
Here's three cheers for Geneva and a wish that every 
girl might go to the 1916 Conference. 

Ruth Mendenhall, '18. 



NEW COLLEGE SONG 



Although the New College Song was published 
in the June Greetings, many of the new students may 
appreciate its repetition. 
Beloved College of Women! Our College! 
Ours ever her Faith, Service, Knowledge. 
Her standards are ours, her courage to do, 
Her loyalty fine, her purpose true, 
Her past and her present, her future are ours, 
Hers are our minds, our talents, our powers. 

CHORUS. 

Beloved College of Women! Our College! 
Ours ever her Faith, Service, Knowledge. 

We stand by her side, 

Her record our pride, 
And hail her our own Woman's College ! 
Beloved College of Women! We love her! 
No other school stands above her. 
Her name is known far — the length of the land, 
By strength of her friendships, an unsevered band, 
And through the years to her Faith, Service, Knowledge 
We'll ever be true, and loyal — Our College ! 

—Winifred Robison, '17 

Page Thirteen 



Ol)£ (TolUge (Breetings 



A CHALLENGE. 

Do you realize that it is your privilege to help in 
the erecting of a milestone which will mark the seven- 
tieth year since the founding of your Alma Mater? In 
what way are you planning to contribute to the suc- 
cess of this year which is so important in the history 
of your college? 



MOBILIZATION. 



After the first week is past, the rest of the time 
until Christmas passes with momentum-gathering 
swiftness. Realizing this, the classes are busy plan- 
ning for the winter's season of rivalry. The essayists 
are already seeking the magazine shelves in prepara- 
tion for the contest, and it is to be hoped that the 
short-story writers are making various significient jot- 
tings in notebooks which will later be revised. The 
Basket-ball classes are very popular indeed this fall 
and it is rumored that there will be some very hotly 
contested games before the shield is awarded. The 
seniors are boasting sufficient athletic material to 
muster two teams for practice. The juniors are not 
idle as the Editor and the Business Manager of the 
Illiwoco are receiving daily visits from various en- 
gravers and binders, and we are sure that this effici- 
ent class will give us an annual in the spring of which 
we can be very proud. The calendar of events is fill- 
ing rapidly and there is all about the college, the 
rhythm of organizations at work. 



Page Fourteen 



Z31)c (College (Bree tings 



CLASS ELECTIONS. 



SENIOR. 
President — Hazel Kinnear. 
Vice-President — Margaret Goldsmith. 
Secretary and Treasurer — Grace Miles. 
Reporter — Mae Blackburn. 



JUNIOR. 

President — Pauline Herrmann. 
Vice-President — Irene Irwin. 
Secretary and Treasurer — Ann Floreth. 



SOPHOMORE. 

President — Feme Parrott. 
Vice-President — Ruth Mendenhall. 
Secretary — Marie Towle. 

ALUMNAE NOTES. 



In the election of Ellen Yates Orr of Pittsfield, 111. 
as delegate to the General Conference of the M. E. 
Church, that body takes into it's councils a woman of 
intellectual strength and of experience in church af- 
fairs, in W. C. T. U. activities, and social and education- 
al interests of her community. 

'97, Miss Annie Hinrichsen, who was appointed 
last April to the position of Inspector of Institutions 
for the Illinois State Charity Commission, is now in 
Chicago inspecting the prisons, etc., of Chicago and 
Cook County. The Chicago Tribune quotes her as 
saying that animals are better cared for in Chicago 
than prisoners. 

Page Fifteen 



Obe (College (Greetings 



'05, On the second of June the marriage of Alice 
Wadsworth and Dr. Alpha P. Applebee was celebrated 
at Grace Church in Jacksonville, 111. Mr. Stearns, the 
director of Music at I. W. C. played several selections 
for the organ and Mrs. Helen Brown Reed, a former 
teacher of voice at the college, sang two solos. Among 
those present were many I. W. C. daughters. 

'08, Mrs. Eugenia Marshall Rainey is in London. 
Her husband, Dr. Warren J. Rainey, is in France as 
surgeon with the English army. 

'08,- From a Jacksonville paper we learn that Dr. 
and Mrs. Canatsey have moved to this city. Mrs. Canat- 
sey is Inez Vera Proudfit of the class of '08. 

11, Gladys Leavall taught last year at Lenox Hall, 
St. Louis. She is now studying for her Ph. D. at the 
University of Chicago, where she took her M. A. in 
1913. 

12, Louise Gates spent part of the summer study- 
ing at the University of Chicago. She is teaching at 
Illiopolis, 111. 

12, Annoncement has been received of the arrival 
of a daughter, Margaret Isabelle,to the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Irwin A. Madden, Normal, 111., on the seventh of 
June. Mrs. Madden is Isabelle Mclntyre of the class 
of 1912. 

12, We also hear of the coming of a son to the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hopper. Mrs- Hopper is 
Ruth Patterson of the class of 1912. 

13, Elizabeth Tendick is studying for her M. 
A. at the University of Illinois. 

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X3i)a (TolUge (Breetlnjjs 



'13, The engagement of Helen Moore to Mr. Harry 
Sheerer was announced in July, when a number of I. 
W. C. girls were being entertained at her home. Mr. 
Sheerer is taking his last year in the McCormick Theo- 
logical Seminary and Helen will return to the College 
in Athens, Georgia where she spent last year. 

'13, The marriage of Elizabeth Dunbar and Reg- 
ford De Thompkins took place at the bride's home in Mt. 
Sterling on June seventeenth, and was followed by a 
western journey. Mr. and Mrs. Thompkins are living 
in Griggsville, 111. 

'14, Hallie Clem is teaching for the second year 
at Virginia, 111; Clara Kelly at Frederickstown, Mo.; 
Geneva Upp at Lahota, North Dakota. Letta Irwin is 
at home, teaching English in the Tuscola High School. 
Abbie Peavoy studied at the University of Minnesota 
this summer, and is teaching English at Lakefield, 
Minn. Mary Watson has gone to teach Domestic 
Science in Vermillim, South Dakota. Erma Lytle 
Elliott took her M. A. in Mathematics at the University 
of Illinois last year and is now athome in Jacksonville. 

The marriage of Miss Effie Berger, former Biol- 
ogy instructor in I. W. C, to Dr. Stanley Phillips took 
place early this month in the Presbyterrian church in 
Naperville, 111. Dr. and Mrs. Phillips will make their 
home in Indiana and the best wishes of L W. C. go with 
them. 

The Tuscola picnic was held June 23 at Patterson 
Springs. A most enthusiastic gathering was present, 
numbering about forty. The attendance of those who 
had been at I. W. C. in previous years was particularly 
gratifying. Everyone felt as if she were a part of 
a college old and well founded, yet new and progressive. 

Page Seventeen 



*OI)e College (Breetings 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 
1913 ENDOWMENT AND IMPROVEMENT FUND 

September 23, 1915. 
Since the last report of this fund there has been 
paid in a total of $5,112.33 by one hundred and nine 
subscribers. Of the 1226 subscribers, 1000 have now 
paid in full. Most of the remaining 226 have paid 
part of their subscription. 

The following summary is very gratifying : 

Total amount pledged $182,242.95 

Total amount paid Sept. 11, 1915 159,012.25 

Balance yet due 23,230.70 

Mr. Wm. A. Rankin has promised to give the col- 
lege $10,000 on condition that these subscriptions be 
paid in cash, and additional subscriptions of $90,000, 
be secured by January 1, 1916. It will thus be seen 
that any failure to pay may seriously embarrass the 
college and we trust that all our friends will now make 
payment of their subscriptions in full. 



FACULTY NOTES. 



There are several new members on the Faculty 
this year: Mrs. Beulah N. Ellis is in charge of the de- 
partment of English ; Mrs. Faye W. Moellering has the 
Department of French ; Miss Rena LaZelle is the new 
voice teacher ; Miss Dorothy Washburn and Miss Helen 
R. Steward are teaching English and History, Science 
and Mathematics in the Academy. 

The interesting vacation doings of the Faculty 
are too numerous to mention but the following are sug- 
gestive. Miss Hay spent part of her summer at Bay 
View, Mich ; Miss Walker attended the Fair and travel- 
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X3l)£ (TolUge (Greetings 



ed in Alaska; Misses Neville, McLaughlin, Hull and 
Johnston were at Kelly Hall at the University of Chi- 
cago; Miss Alexander visited at Devil's Lake, Mich.; 
Miss Knopf spent much of her time at the Chicago Art 
Institute; Mrs. Colean was in Omena, Mich.; Mrs. Kolp 
studied Theoretical Music in Chicago; Miss Gleckler 
camped in the S- Dakota mountains ; Miss Mothershead 
was at Upton Flats, New York ; and Dr. and Mrs. Har- 
ker visited their children in the west and incidentally 
attended the Fair. 



LOCALS. 

The elevator has been undergoing repairs. Since 
it has come into service again, a committee of elevator 
experts has been appointed by Dr. Harker, to see that 
all rules and regulations are enforced. 

September eighteenth, Mr. Moody, a missionary 
from Africa gave us more historical and geographical 
information about the great dark continent in five 
minutes than could be printed on several pages. 

The largest freshman class in the history of the 
college, came in this fall, and also the largest class of 
Degree Seniors fill the front seats in chapel. 

Words have little value to express the regret the 
whole college feels in the loss of Marie Miller. Dr. 
Miller is to fill the pulpit in Hoopeston, Illinois, and 
Marie will be a senior at Depauw, her father's Alma 
Mater. 

Grace Miles attended the State Fair at Spring- 
field, September twenty-second, and heard lectures on 
canning by a Washington expert. 

Page Nineteen 



*€>t>e College (Greetings 



Lightning struck a big elm on the campus during 
a recent storm. Little damage, but much excitement 
resulted. 

One evening before screens were put in Miss 
Mothershead's windows, she was able to count seventy- 
three distinct varieties of bugs and moths about her 
light. This is considerably better than Heinz, who 
claims only fifty-seven varieties. 

Geneva Anderson motored to Springfield to the 
State Fair, with relatives, Saturday September eigh- 
teenth. 

Dorothy Westphal has the distinction of having 
had the first sprained ankle of the year. 

Mr. Hasenstab, while on his circuit of appoint- 
ments, spent Thursday afternoon, September 16th, with 
his daughter Grace. 

* 
STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION. 

The foundation is firmly made and now comes 
the time for building up the super-structure. With 
the difficult work of organization behind us, we are 
ready to enter our heritage, years of steady growth 
in that "fine spirit of loyalty to ourselves, each other, 
and the college." The Students' Association has much 
to accomplish, for it cannot expect to be full-grown in 
one years time, yet the outlook for the coming months 
is very promising. The house government is now in 
running order; since the election of the Proctors and 
House-chairman, the various members of the Execu- 
tive Board are taking their places ; but above all there 
is evidence of the desire, on the part of both old and 
new girls to live up to the community ideals as well as 
community rules. 

Page Twenty 



*DI)e ColUgt <Brcetitt35 



Y. W. C. A, NOTES. 

The Cabinet girls were kept busy the first two 
days of school meeting trains and helping the new girls 
to get started. 

We are very sorry not to have Grace Reavis, our 
Mission Study Class Chairman, back again. The va- 
cancy has not yet been filled. 

Thursday evening, September 16, the Association 
invited the intire student body to join in a "Walk-out." 
The leader Mary Harrison, led the line to East Woods 
where a delightful picnic supper was served. After 
supper, fires were lighted and marshmellows toasted. 

Our annual reception for the new girls was held 
in the Society Halls, Saturday evening. During the 
evening, the girls were divided into groups according 
to the states in which they live and asked to give a 
stunt of some sort. Many clever and characteristic 
stunts resulted. The Indiana group wanted us to be 
sure to remember their poet, Riley, and repeated the 
following lines : 

"I've been here for most a week 
At I. W. C. near Mauvaisterre Creek, 
I've got some friends and a new fall hat, 
I won't go back where my beau lives at." 

All new girls and Faculty received an invitation 
to the first Y. W. C. A. service, Sunday. The meeting, 
on the theme of Friendship was led by the President, 
Johanna Onken. Nora Alexander sang "There is a 
Green Hill Far Away." 

PHI NU NOTES. 

The first week of school brought the joy of being 
together again, but we are more than sorry to lose our 

Page Twenty-one 



"&\)i College ©reelings 



president Marie Miller, who has moved to Hoopeston. 
Margaret Goldsmith entertained at a farewell party 
for her at her home on West College Avenue, on Fri- 
day evening, September 17, and during the evening 
Miss Lazelle sang charmingly. Some of our town 
members were present; among them was Millicent 
Rowe and her friend, Alice Hastings, a most interest- 
ing girl from Honolulu, Hawaii. 

We enjoyed a week-end visit, over September 18th 
from Irene Crum, our last year's president, who is 
teaching English in Lewistown. We have also heard 
from several other old girls, among them Celia Cath- 
cart, who is teaching in a settlement school among the 
mountain whites of Kentucky. 

Our hall is doubly attractive to us this year, since 
we have our new victrola. 



THETA SIGMA NOTES. 

Eighteen Thetas are back this fall, ready for work 
or play. We miss those who did not come back, but 
are glad to have two of our old girls, Mabel Stoltz and 
Mable Larson, with us again this year. For our work 
we expect to study the folk love of different countries 
in connection with our modern customs. 

Mary Baldridge, Ruth Mendenhall, and Edna Robb 
enjoyed the week end, previous to the opening of school 
at the home of Ann Floreth. 



BELLES LETTRES. 

After a happy vacation, Belles Lettres girls are 

Page Twenty-two 



T5\)t College (Greeting* 



back with the usual enthusiasm to start the new year's 
work. 

During the latter part of June, Letta and Irene 
Irwin gave a Belles Lettres houseparty at their home 
in Tuscola. After the houseparty Genevieve Dague 
started to meet her mother and they are now traveling 
in California. 

Much to our surprise the other day, we received 
a letter from Mrs. Beatty, who was Margaret Wilder 
last year. 

A handsome new skin is the gift of one of our old 
members. 

Hallie Clem spent the week-end with us. 



LAMBDA ALPHA MU. 

As a society, we are proud to have twenty-one of 
our members with us again and we are anticipating a 
most profitable and enjoyable year. 

The society has adopted as its course of study for 
the coming year, The Woman's Movement, and we are 
hoping to affiliate ourselves with the Woman's Club 
of Jacksonville, thereby broadening our conception of 
this world-wide movement. 



EXPRESSION. 

The Expression Department opens the year with 
an excellent enrollment. Each day has increased the 
registration and the outlook is most encouraging for 
the year. 

There are three seniors in the department this 

Page Twenty-three 



'Dlje College (Br^etings 



year; Corinne Hughes, one of last year's graduates in 
Expression, who gave "Peg 0' My Heart" so charm- 
ingly, has returned for her B. A. degree and to do Post 
Graduate work in Expression; and Alma Harmel and 
Lucille Rexroat, both of whom this year hope to re- 
ceive their Bachelor's Degree and at the same time 
graduate in Expression. Both of these young ladies 
have been heard many times in plays and recitals and 
their friends expect much of them. 

Among the new girls who have registered in the 
Expression Department are a number of girls of ad- 
vanced standing and training. 

The class in Argumentation and Debate should be 
sought for by all college girls. The department de- 
sires very much to inaugerate this year a series of live 
class debates. 

A new course in Expression is to be introduced 
this year. It is to be a training class for the teach- 
ing of Public School Reading and Story Telling. The 
work will include Primary and Kindergarten games 
and ought to be of interest to all girls who contemplate 
public school work. 



THE COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

The College of Music opens this year with a great- 
ly increased enrollment over last year and the pros- 
pects for a record season are very bright. 

A number of old teachers are back again. The 
only new face on the faculty being Miss Lazelle in the 
voice department. 

Page Twenty-four 



X3l>e College (Breetlngs 



A large number of students from last year have 
returned and are taking up their work and a particu- 
larly gratifying feature of the enrollment is the enter- 
ing of a goodly number of students for a regular course 
in the College of Music,, either for the Public School 
Certificate, the Teacher's Certificate or the Bachelor 
of Music Diploma. 

The violin class shows a notable increase over 
last year and in its size and quality, argues well for the 
College Orchestra. 

There are a large number of excellent voices en- 
rolled in the vocal department and the prospects for 
an excellent Madrigal Club are very good. 

Several of last years students have positions to 
teach for this year. Miss Ima Berryman is teaching 
Public School music in Griggsville. Miss Helen Ken- 
dall has a large class of pupils in and near her home 
of Ridgefarm. Mary Louise Witbeck is teaching fifth 
grade in Savannah, 111., and is playing the organ in one 
of the churches of the town. Miss Winifred Sale play- 
ed with distinction in the Methodist Church at Wat- 
seka, 111 ; Miss Edith Hillerby spent the summer at Bay 
View, Mich, and was organist for the orchestra there ; 
also, substituted for the regular organist for two Sun- 
days in Petosky; Miss Beulah Smith continued her 
study with Mrs. Day during the summer and Mrs. 
Katherine Shroll has been in Chicago singing for some 
of the leading managers. 

$ 
ART NOTES. 

The classes in the studio are starting very enthu- 
siastically with an unusually large enrollment. 

Jesse Clem and Florence Cranston posed for the 



Page Twenty-five 



7o\)t College <Breetlnjs 



first Friday Sketch Class. We are expecting many 
interesting poses this year and from the work done in 
the first Sketch Class, we are sure the "new girls" are 
going to enjoy it as much as the "old girls." 

Norma Virgin, graduate of Art '08, has accepted 
a position in New York City with an illustrating firm. 
She will also study in one of the New York Art Schools 
and is starting out on a promising career. Dorothy 
Stevens, who graduated last June, is supervising the 
Art Work in the public schools of Rock Island. 

HOME ECONOMICS CLUB. 

The old girls of the Home Economics Club welcom- 
ed the new girls in that department at an informal 
party in September. Our regular monthly meetings 
will be held at 4:30 on the first Thursday of each 
month. We are planning to discuss topics of general 
interest to those taking the course and every girl reg- 
istered in the department is expected to become a 
member and to take an active part in the club work. 

% 
SWIMMING POOL. 

When the new gymnasium is constructed next year 
there is to be in it an entirely modern and completely 
equipped swimming pool. The friend of the college, 
who has assured us of this has the true gratitude of 
every I. W. C girl. 

A Freshman — "Miss J., how many grammes are 
there in a peck?" 

Miss J.— "I don't know." 

A Freshman — "Why don't you know? We have 
to know and I should think you would." 

Page Twenty-six 



OUR PICTURES 

ARE HUNG IN THE BEST HOMES IN THE CITY 
AND COUNTY 



Mollenbrok & McCullough Studio 

WEST STATE ST. 



THE 



Big City Market 

All Kinds of Fancy 
Fruit 

CANNON BROS. 

W. StatcSt. Ill, Phone 1288 

WE DELIVER 



SEE 

BONANSINGA 

FOR 

Fancy Fruits 

Confectionery 

?2 East Side Square 



Wouldn't it be awful, if: 

Mary B. were a Faculty member. 

Miss Gleckler a Senior. 

Mary Blackburn an Academy? 



KODAK- FINISHING 

This is our SPECIALTY— You Want the BEST Results— 
Our Workmanship and Materials Give Them 

VAIL-&, VAIL 

Oswald's Drug Store 71 East Side Square 



Secretary Photographer's Association of Illinois. 

Awarded Silver Medal for Home Photographer at Illinois State 
Convention, 1914 

OTTO SPEITH 

PORTRAITURE BY PHOTOGRAPHY 
SOUTHWEST COR. SQUARE 



GIRLS, PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



ROBERT H. REID 

"Photographs That Please" 

Member Photographer's Association of America 
HOCKENHULL BUILDING 




^^sn^ 



C0LLEGE_F00TWEAR 

Large assortment of Foot- 
wear for every occasion. 

Dress, Street and Bed-Room 
Footwear. 

HOPPERS 

WE REPAIR SHOES 



MATHIS, KAMM & SHIBE 

SAY 

This is just to remind you that 
we can suply any and all of 
your FOOTWEAR needs. 



CITY STEAM 

Cleaning and Dyeing Works 

208 E. State 

E. A. SCHOEDSACEK, Proprietor 



Party Dresses, Kid Gloves 

Sliippers a Specialty 



STYLE + QUALITY + FINE SHOE MAKING 



THE GYPSY BOOT 
WILL BE THE 
LEADING STYLE 
THIS FALL 




WE HAVE THEM 

IN 

BRONZE KID 

BLUE KID 

NAT KID 



Complete Line of Evening Slippers 

JAS. McGINNIS & CO. 



f. _ — -_ — - — ^ 

FOR THOSE WHO DISCRIMINATE 

We simply suggest that it has taken our constant effort to please the 
students who come to our city. We select only the BEST materials and 
and prepare them with skillful, loving care. 

PURE CANDIES, HOT AND COLD SODA, BRICK ICE CREAM 

AND PLAIN AND DECORATED BIRTHDAY CAKES. 
Telephone 227 ALL PACKAGES DELIVERED 

JOHN W. MERRIGAN 

227 WEST STATE STREET 


CJ.DEPPE&CO. 

Known for "Ready-toWear" and 
.... Popular Priced Dry Goods.... 


KUM-RITE-IN 
Let Us Show You the Most Complete 
Line of Silk Hosiery, Silk Gloves, 
American Lady Corsets, Kid Gloves, 
Fancy Neckwear, Laces, Ribbons 
and Trimmings. 


^BT~ DRY GOODS STOR t ^^ 




Time — Second registration day. 
Place — Entrance to disabled elevator. 

Girl — M.G. (with much feeling), "I believe I'll make a noise like a 
trunk and see if they won't take me up." 


T TSaf est Place to Trade £1 

rilLLERBY'>3 

DRY GOODS STORE 

PHONES 309 

v: = 


Alllr \ SWEATERS 
LflUILU HOSIERY 

FRANK BYRNS, 

HAT STORE 

j 



J. F\ BROWN 

MUSIC HOUSE 

Musical Talking 

Merchandise Machines 

Sheet Music 
19 S. Side Square, Jacksonville 




Jacksonville's Foremost Store for 

Men 

And Specialties for Women 

Knitted Silk Coats 

Sweater Coats, Student Caps 

Manish Rain Coats and Hats 

Trunks and Hand Bags 



REAL ENJOYMENT 

The kind that lasts and is pleas- 
ant to recall — 
in one of our fine rigs, or help 
her arrange a Hay Ride Party. 
Phone us for Carriages for any 
occasion 

EITHER PHONE 850 

CHERRY'S LIVERY 



Freshie — "In what room does the German class meet?" 

M. H.— "Room 15." 

Freshie — "Well, where on earth do you begin to count?" 



loover 



&Sk 



reve 



Have a Complete Line of Drugs, 
Kodaks, Perfumes 

Stationery and Holiday Gifts 

We Do Developing and Printing 
East & West Side Sq. 



We Welcome You as a Student 
after Knowledge 



Pleased to have you call on your 
down town trips 



Badger Drug Store 



235 E. State St. 



Illinois 57 



Cafe 



Confectionery 



peacock 3nn 



Catering 



Soda 



Candies 



PIEPENBRING'S 

VARIETY STORE 
ONE BLOCK EAST OF COLLEGE 

CANDIES, CAKES, COOKIES, 

PIES, SANDWICHES, 

. .POP ON ICE, GROCERIES 

CALIFORNIA FRUITS 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES 



c 'The Home of the Crispette" 

The Sanitary Pop-corn 
and Crispette Shop 



Pop-corn That Melts in Your 
Mouth 

Roasted and Salted Peanuts 

EAST STATE ST. 



D. W. — "Now that we have small rugs, we want to sell our carpet 
sweeper." 

Freshie — "Don't you have to sweep small rugs?" 



(Tafe ybatz 

And Annex for Ladies. 
221=223 EAST STATE STREET 

Illinois Phone 308 Bell Phone 57 




Wedding 
Reception 
Banquets 
Luncheons 
^^^^2Lw Musicals 

Theater Parties 
JJH Dinner Parties 
Card Glubs 

Special attention to all College functions 

VICKERY'S 

Jacksonville, 111. 




Want 

Cut flowers 

FROM 



a* 



JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 

Both Phones 



GRAND OPERA HOUSE 

Harold J. Johnson, Mgr. 



High ClasS'Vaudeville & Pictures 

4-Piece Orchestra Afternoon 

and Evening 

A BIG Special Feature Every Monday 

PRICES 5 and 10c 



SCOTT'S THEATRE 



ALWAYS THE 
LATEST AND 
BEST IN 
MOTION 
PICTURES 



Soph. — "What did your room-mate wear to the Y. W. C. A. reception?" 
Freshie. — "A dress of a grey gauze effect with white shoes and stock- 
ings to match." 



HARRY HOFMAN FLORAL CO. 

Designs, Cut Flowers 
Plants 

SOUTHWEST COR. SQUARE 



Greenhouse South Diamond Street 

Store: Bell Phone 154—111. 182 
Greenhouse, Bell 775 



WE WILL PIPE YOU RHOUSE FOR 

GAS 

OR WIRE IT FOR 

ELECTRICITY 

AT COST 

Jacksonville Ry & Light Co. 

TWO YEARS TO PAY 224 S. MAIN 




THAT OUR HOME-MADE CANDIES ARE MADE TO PLEASE 

YOU 

That you can get what you want like you want it here in the 

way of SUNDAES, SODAS, and all kinds of HOT DRINKS 

JUST PHONE 70— WE DELIVER. 

SttulUitix 3? ^Hamilton 

216 East State Street 



LATEST STYLES IN 
FALL & WINTER MILLINERY 

Fisk Hats a Specialty 



Mrs. M. O'Neil 

206 East State Street 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 

Millinery 
Neelecraft, Cossets 



S. Side Square 



G. W. "We got Y's at Geneva this summer." 
M. J. "I too, got wise when I went there/' 



L. C. & R. E. HENRY 
DEALERS IN FINE MILLINERY 



Always Something New and 

Up-to-Date 

238 South Side Square 




JACKSQNV(LL£, Iu.* 

Low Prices and Square Dealings 
Keep Us Busy 



J 



Everything for the Home 



Everything for the Home 



Andre Sc Andre 



t "7""yy> 



for R 



Student Headquarters 



l Furnishings 
The Best Goods for the Price, No Matter What the Price. 



>■****-*$&*& £%$•" 



The 
Gift 
Store 



Andre (Sh Andre 



The 
Gift 
Store 



DRUGS 



BOOKS 



City Drug and Book 

Store 

J. A. OBERMEYER & SON 

S. Side Square 

Give Us a Call 
Bell 457 III inois 572 

College Suplies Pennants 



ALDEN BROWN 

314 W. STATE ST. 

Pictures Artist 

Frames Materials 



Miss Wakely in Virgil — "When you are scanning this line, look out 
for your feet." 



All the faculty, students and friends 
of the College should have a checking 
or sayings acount with 

F. G. Farrell & Co- 
bankers 

F. E. Farrell President 

E. E. Crabtree V. President 

H. H. Potter Cashier 

M. W. Osborne Ass't Cash. 



Pacific Motel 

Jacksonville, 111. 
Jacksonville's Best Hotel 



70 ROOMS 



S. M. CAMPBELL, Manager 



VISIT 

Sch ram's 

JEWELRY STORE 

WE HAVE A FULL LINE OF COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Also Good-looking and Good-wearing Goods. 
Will Be Pleased to Show Them. 



GO TO THE 

RUSSELL & LYON 

JEWELRY STORE 

FOR THE BEST REPAIRING OF 
ALL KINDS 



E.W.BASSETT 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 
DIE STATIONERY 
ENGRAVED CARDS 
SILVER AND GLASS 
ART POTTERY 
NOVELTIES 
No. 21 SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 



L. S. "Burial was very important to the Romans, since they doted 
on the future life." 



BRADY BROS. 

EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 
House Furnishings and Paints 
45-47 SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 



GAY'S 



RELIABLE 



HARDWARE 



=^ 



COLLEGE GIRLS: 

See our Motor Coats, Mackinaws and Sweaters 
Also Ladies' Holeproof Hosiery 

LUKEMAN BROS 

GIRLS, PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 

Cj)e &per$ J&attonal i&anfe 

Established 1852 



CAPITAL 

$2,000,000 

SURPLUS 

$2000,000 

DEPOSITS 

$50,000 




UNITED STATES 
DEPOSITORY 

POSTAL SAVINGS 
DEPOSITORY 

MEMBER OF 

RESERVE BANK 

FEDERAL 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 
We have provided a Special Department for Ladies with a window 
for their exclusive use in transacting their business, also a Ladies' writ- 
ing room adjoinng, daintily furnished, which is at their disposal. 

OFFICERS 

M. F. Dunlap President O. F. Buffe Cashier 

Andrew Russel V. President H. C. Clement Asst. Cashier 
Chas. B. Graff V. President W. G. Goebel Asst. Cashier 
H. J. Rodgers V. President H. K. Chenowith Ast. Cashier 
Arthur Vannier Ast. Cashier 



DIRECTORS 



Owen P. Thompson 
E. F. Goltra 
John W. Leach 
Andrew Russel 



George Dietrick 
H. M. Capps 
O. F. Buffe 
M. F. Dunlap 



Society Programs and Menus 
THE ROACH PRESS 

ILLINOIS PHONE 236 OPPOSITE POST OFFICE 

Our Customers Say: "The Service is a little better." 



LENG. MAGILL 

FOR PRINTING 

PROGRAMS, INVITATIONS 
PERSONAL CARDS, ETC. 

No. 227 EAST STATE STREET 
Illinois Phone 418 

Our Motto: "Not how cheap, but how 
good." 



JOB PRINTING OF ALL KINDS 

JOHN K. LONG 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 
Programs and Stationery 

213 WEST MORGAN STREET 
ILINOIS PHONE 400 



Proctor — "I wish you girls wouldn't make so much noise. The Sen- 
ior next door says she can't read." 

Freshie — "Well, isn't that queer, I could read when she was five 
years old." 



Blje Graphic 'SVrts 
Concern 



PRINTERS 
PUBLISHERS 
STATIONERS 
Engraved Cards 
Artistic Programs 
for Special Occasions 



I.M.BUNCE&CO 



PRINTING 



OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 



Plain Chiina for Decorating 



^ 



=^ 



Dr. GEORGE E. STACY 

SOUTH-EAST CORNER PUBLIC SQ. 

(Over Hppers) 

Sees Patients by Appointment at 
Office and Elsewhere 



OFFICE HOURS 11:00 to 1:; 2 to 4. 

TELEPHONES: Bell 435-Illinois 1335 

and (home) 1334 



Dr. ALBYN LINCOLN ADAMS 

OCULIST AND AURIST 

To the State School for the Blind 

323 WEST STATE STREET 



Practice Limited to Diseases of the 
EYE, EAR, NOSE & THROAT 
Both Telephones 



ALPHA B. APPLEBEE 

DENTIST 
326 WEST STATE STREET 



Dr. AUSTIN C. KINGSLEY 

DENTIST 

409 AYERS BANK BUILDING 

Both Phones 760 



A. M. M. "Don't remember to look at the bulletin boards 



daily." 



S.S.KRESGECO. 

5 and 10c STORE 



A POPULAR PLACE for COLLEGE 
GIRLS 



212-214 E. State St. 



Cloaks, Suits, Furs 
and Millinery 

At Prices Tkat Are Rigkt 



STYLISH APPAREL FOR YOUNG 

WOMEN 

SUITS, DRESSES, MILLINERY 
CLOAKS, WAISTS, LINGERIE 

In addition to the Newest Models in Ready-to-wear Garments 
from the Best Makers — we are showing the Correct Styles 
in CORSETS,— the Newest HOSIERY, Street and Evening 
Gloves, Dainty Neckwear, Handkerchiefs, Ribbons, Toilet 
Articles, Art Goods. 

F. J. WADDELL &, COMPANY 
GIRLS, PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 

PHELPS & OSBORNE 

IS THE COLLEGE GIRL'S 
STORE 
SUITS, DRESSES, COATS, RIBBONS, LACES, AND NOTIONS 
POPULAR PRICES ALWAYS 

FASHIONABLE DRESS MAKING 
AND TAILORING 

A FULL LINE OF DRESS TRIMMINGS 
MRS. EMMA CORRINGTON 

ILLINOIS PHONE 547 241 WEBSTER AVE. 

FLORETH & COMPANY 

LEADERS IN EVERYTHING NEW IN MILLINERY 
COATS FOR LADIES, MISSES AND CHILREN 
DRESS GOODS AND SILKS 

AT LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES FOR CASH 



2=*>l 



Jacksonville Candy Company 

We have just installed our New Soda Fountain, and we 
can serve everything in the confectionery line Hot or Cold 
— Also wemake all kinds of Homemade Candies and guarantee 
them under the pure food law. 

We have the very best electric Piano at our store. 
57 E. SIDE SQUARE B. J. GEANETOS, Prop. 

BOTH PHONES 566 



The Home of Good Things to Eat 

Walker's 
Grocery 

Homemade 

BREAD, CAKES, COOKIES 

SALAD DRESSING, Etc. 



205 East Morgan 



Both Phones 



W. E. Boston 

DEALER IN GROCERIES AND 
MEAT 



600 EAST COLLEGE AVENUE 
Both Phones 100 



R. G. "Do you know the other McGhee girl?" 

M. Mc. "Yes, she is my sister." 

R. G. Self reproachfully, "Oh, how awful." 



Ideal Bread 

is Better; 
so are the cakes 



DORWART'S CASH 
MARKET 

ALL KINDS OF FRESH AND 

SALT MEATS, FISH, POULTRY 

ETC. Both Phones 196 

230 WEST STATE STREET 




Music Hall 

Erected 1906 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



ELLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 



College of Liberal Arts 
College of Music v > 

School of Fine Arts 
School of Expression 
School of Home Economics 
A Standard College 

Regular college and academy courses leading to 
Bachelor's degree. Pre-eminently a Christian 
college with every facility for thorough work. 
Located in the Middle West, in a beautiful, dig- 
nified, old college town, noted for its literary 
and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends who are 
looking for a good college. 

Call or address, Registrar, 

ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

Jacksonville, Illinois